Preschool Education in Singapore – What to Look Out For?

Preschool Education in Singapore – What to Look Out For?

Expenses Needed in Preschool

One of the things that parents want for their children is education. That is why they do everything just to make sure that their child gets the best. As much as possible, they make sure that their child enters one of the best or good schools they know. However, it is not easy especially when it comes to expenses. When you try to ask parents, almost all of them might say that sending a child to school is not easy, and it’s true. It requires a lot of time, effort, and especially money. But besides this, what are the factors about a school that you should consider when choosing a preschool?

 

Transition-focused Preschool

A notable preschool you should look out for is My Little Campus, which caters from infants to kindergarten children. Notably is their kindergarten programme, which has a focus on preparing children for primary school, the most important milestone of education in a child’s education in Singapore. Programmes focus on linguistics, Mathematics and Science concepts as well as life skills needed in the path ahead.

To find out more, visit their website at http://mylittlecampus.com.sg.

Next, in an article by The Asian Parent, let us look into the largest preschool in the world which is located in Singapore. Let us try to see how expenses are in there.


The largest preschool in the world is now open in Singapore!

Would you enrol your child here?

The world’s largest pre-school for kids aged 18 months to six years was officially opened in Singapore today (August 30).

The Early Learning Village is a collaboration between the Australian International School (AIS) and the Stamford International School. At 50,000 sq ft, more than 100 classrooms and five buildings, it has the capacity to take in 2,100 children, says a Channel NewsAsia report. 

“If we had set up schools separately we wouldn’t have been able to have such an amazing facility that we [the schools] can both share,” said Mr Michael Day, Stamford American’s early years’ principal.

“The building does look large when you come in from the outside,” said Mr Adam Patterson, head of early years at AIS. “But for the children and the parents, the experience is that the hub of four classrooms is like a secure little village school. Read more here.

The tuition fee of S$14,500 per semester is really mouth dropping. Many people say that you don’t need that kind of school, but if you can actually afford it, then there is nothing wrong with sending your child there.

Now, let us read about Singapore’s first inclusive preschool, Kindle Garden, which will now double their fees in 2018. Young Parents Singapore will tell us about it .

Singapore’s first inclusive preschool Kindle Garden will double fees in 2018

Fees at Kindle Garden, touted as the first inclusive preschool in Singapore, will jump to up to twice the current amount in 2018, just two years after the opening of the centre.

In what is considered a rare move in the pre-school sector, the centre will also adopt a tiered-fee model, with low-income families charged less, The Straits Times has learnt.

Some parents of children enrolled in the centre were taken aback by the extent of the fee hike. When pre-schools raise fees, most do so by 5 per cent to 10 per cent.

Kindle Garden told parents last week that it would raise fees from $980 to $1,880 a month for full-day childcare from January 2018. This is before factoring in the goods and services tax, and subsidies from charity Awwa, which runs the centre, and the Government. Read more here.

Kindle Garden would raise fees for some costs but it will surely make other parents transfer their children to another school. However, what is good about Kindle Garden is that low-income families would be charged less. In addition to that case, Calvin Yang will tell us about preschools who give extra strains on parents’ wallets.

Pre-school extras a strain on parents’ wallets

They may cost up to $1,000 a year, but many pay up so that their children don’t ‘lose out’

These days, parents not only have to contend with steep pre-school fees, but they also have to budget for the extra costs that come with giving their tots the “full educational experience”.

On average, parents are forking out a few hundred dollars a year – sometimes up to a thousand – for anything from concert costumes, to field trips and graduation photos.

Excursions, for instance, are held around four times a year, costing about $15 to $50 per trip depending on transport charges, entry fees and whether lunch is provided. These can be to places like Sentosa or the zoo.

Meanwhile, costumes for concerts can cost from $30 to close to $100. While these are considered “optional”, many parents say they would still pay for them, for fear that their children will “miss out”. Read more here.

Extra costs are really inevitable in schools especially for extracurricular activities. Some of these expenses are for fieldtrips, costumes, and some extra books. When it happens one at a time, it may seem fine, but when added up, it will feel heavy. There may be a lot of expenses but we also have to think that it is for our children. These expenses would mean more experiences for our children. We just have to be wise in making our decisions.